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Creating More Effective Plumbing


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Creating More Effective Plumbing

When it comes to managing a business, handling the housekeeping is just part of the game. A few years ago we realized that there were some serious plumbing problems in our building, so we turned to a professional to help us out. It was incredible to see how much of a difference these experts made, because within a few short months things had improved dramatically. We were able to keep our sinks and bathrooms cleaner, and it really felt like our business was operating correctly for the first time in a long time. Check out this blog for great information about how a plumber could help your business.

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How To Remove And Prevent Water Heater Sediment

If your home has hard water that contains a lot of calcium, then your water heater might be in danger of having internal scale buildup. Scale buildup is a problem because it leads to thick sediment that will blow out the water heater's heating elements and rupture the hot water tank. To prevent this fate, here is more information about water heater sediment and how you can eliminate it:

The Tell-Tale Signs Your Water Heater has Sediment Buildup Inside of It

There are three tell-tale signs your hot water heater's tank has calcium buildup inside of it. They are:

  • scale formation on plumbing fixtures

  • white particles floating in your water

  • a decreased flow of hot water in your home

If you notice any of these signs, then it is a sure sign your water heater has sediment inside of its tank that must be removed.

How to Remove Existing Water Heater Sediment

Since the sediment inside of your water heater will continue to build up and will eventually ruin the tank and heating elements if you don't take action, you must flush out the water heater's tank at least once every year. Thankfully, flushing out a water heater is a simple procedure that any homeowner can perform.

To remove the sediment buildup in your water heater, follow these steps:

  • turn off the water heater's power

  • turn off the cold water connection on the top of the water heater

  • connect a garden hose to the water spigot on the bottom of the water heater

  • place the other end of the hose in your bathtub

  • open the spigot and drain all of the water and sediment out of the tank

  • when the tank is empty, close the spigot and remove the hose

  • open the cold water connection and refill the water heater's tank

Finally, once the water heater's tank is full, you can turn its power back on. You cannot turn on the power before the tank is full because the internal heating elements will prematurely heat up and blow out when they come into contact with the cold water.

Preventing Future Water Heater Sediment Problems

If you do not want the hassle of cleaning out your water heater's sediment each year, then you can prevent its formation altogether by installing a water softener on your home's water system. A water softener is a simple appliance that uses salt to remove the calcium in your water. Without the calcium in your water, water scale and water heater sediment cannot form. The salt you add to your water softener is available at most grocery and hardware stores and is inexpensive.

Finally, when the time comes that you need to replace your water heater, purchase one that has an internal stirring mechanism. This type of water heater keeps the hot water stirred up and prevents sediment from growing on the heating elements and on the bottom of the tank. 

To learn more, contact a plumber at a company like Mike Hensley Plumbing Inc.